12 Things To See at the Armory Show This Weekend

Founded in 1994 by four gallerists—Colin de Land, Pat Hearn, Matthew Marks, and Paul Morris—the Armory Show began life as the Gramercy International Art Fair, a yearly event at which art dealers took over rooms in the then-funky Gramercy Park Hotel, displaying art on chipped bureaus and in dimly lit bathrooms.  Now in its 26th year, the Armory Show is a much grander affair with nearly 200 exhibitors spread out across two piers on Manhattan's West Side.

THE ARMORY SHOW 2020

March 5 – 8, 2020

Piers 90 and 94, New York City

https://www.thearmoryshow.com/

Hours:
Thursday, March 5: Noon – 8 PM
Friday, March 6: Noon – 8 PM
Saturday, March 7: Noon – 7 PM
Sunday, March 8: Noon – 6 PM

Founded in 1994 by four gallerists—Colin de Land, Pat Hearn, Matthew Marks, and Paul Morris—the Armory Show began life as the Gramercy International Art Fair, a yearly event at which art dealers took over rooms in the then-funky Gramercy Park Hotel, displaying art on chipped bureaus and in dimly lit bathrooms.  Now in its 26th year, the Armory Show is a much grander affair with nearly 200 exhibitors spread out across two piers on Manhattan’s West Side.

Here are 12 highlights:

1.
Pier 90 has been given over to two curated sections. The first, “Focus,” is 31 one- and two-person presentations organized by Jamilla James, curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. The second,  “Perspectives,” devoted to historical artworks, was overseen by Nora Burnett Abrams, director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. A standout of the former, Inman Gallery’s presentation of works by Houston-based artist Jamal Cyrus includes an installation from Cyrus’s ongoing project Pride Records, which charts the history of a fictional black-owned record shop in Detroit.
PIER 90, BOOTH F10

Jamal Cyrus, Pride Frieze—Jerry White’s Record Shop, Central Avenue, Los Angeles, 2005-2017, record sleeves, vinyl records, digital prints, ink, watercolor, tape, Masonite, gesso, acrylic paint, plywood, wax, Plexiglas, reclaimed salvaged wood, 121 × 126 × 12 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston.

2.
In “Perspectives,” Toronto gallery Caviar20 is showing color photos by Nan Goldin alongside pictures by photojournalist Weegee (Arthur Fellig) (1899-1968), whose 1930s and ’40s black-and-white photographs of couples and parties make an admirable pairing with Goldin’s documentation of women around the downtown NYC subcultures of the late 1980s and early ’90s .
PIER 90, BOOTH 103

Installation view of “Your Mirror: Nan Goldin and Weegee” at Caviar20, Booth 103, The Armory Show, New York, March 5–8, 2020.

3.
One of the fair’s special projects is a presentation of photographer Dawoud Bey’s “Harlem, U.S.A., 1975–1979” series at Sean Kelly Gallery. A conversation between the artist and Studio Museum director Thelma Golden will take place at Pier 90’s VIP room Saturday at 4:30pm.
PIER 94, BOOTH 501

Dawoud Bey, A Man in a Bowler Hat, Harlem, NY, 1976, gelatin silver print, image: 8 1/8 x 11 7/8 inches, paper: 11 x 14 inches, framed: 17 1/8 x 21 1/8 x 1 1/2 inches, edition of 10 with 2 APs. Copyright © Dawoud Bey. Courtesy the artist and Sean Kelly, New York.

4.
At Pier 94, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery’s packed booth features a great side-by-side presentation of two paintings, one a 1945 still life and the other a 1965 abstraction made after a move to Paris, by Harlem Renaissance artist Beauford Delaney.
PIER 94, BOOTH 508

Beauford Delaney (1901–1979), Untitled (Still Life with Idol), 1945, oil on canvas, 18 1/4 x 24 1/4 inches. Copyright © Estate of Beauford Delaney by permission of Derek L. Spratley, Esquire, Court Appointed Administrator, courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York.

5.
Several galleries—including this one—are exhibiting Imi Knoebel’s better-known geometric paintings, but a 1980s gestural abstraction by the artist commands the booth at Christian Lethert.
PIER 94, BOOTH 521

Imi Knoebel, Untitled, 1985, acrylic on hardboard, scratched, 80 1/3 x 165 1/3 inches. Christian Lethert, Cologne.

6.
Among its offerings, Kaufmann Repetto has a group of ceramic sculptures—a highlight of P.S.1’s 2019 survey of her work—by Lebanese and American artist Simone Fattal.
PIER 94, BOOTH 608

Simone Fattal, Woman with Necklace, 2011, stoneware fired in a wood kiln, 24 3/4 x 13 3/4 x 8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Kaufmann Repetto, Milan & New York.

7.
At one of the fair’s most thoughtfully curated booths, A arte Invernizzi is presenting works in a Minimalist-Conceptual vein by four postwar European artists: Alan Charlton (b. 1948), François Morellet (1926–2016), Niele Toroni (b. 1937), and Mario Nigro (1917–1992).
PIER 94, BOOTH 617

François Morellet, Contorsions n°5, 2007, acrylic on canvas and red neon, 43 1/3 x 44 inches. Courtesy A Arte Invernizzi, Milan.

8.
Haines Gallery’s booth sparkles with a group of four mirrored pieces by Iranian artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian (1922-2019),  whose work drew from both New York postwar abstraction and Iranian decorative arts.
PIER 94, BOOTH 908

Monir Farmanfarmaian, Untitled (Square), 2011, mirror, reverse painted glass, and plaster on wood, 28 x 31 1/2 inches. Courtesy of Haines Gallery, San Francisco.

9.
Eric Firestone Gallery is showing figurative paintings by Varnette Honeywood (1950–2010), whose work was popularized by its appearance on The Cosby Show, as well as a spectacular piece by Joe Overstreet (1933–2019) from his 1970–1972 “Flight Pattern“ series.
PIER 94, BOOTH 909

Joe Overstreet, HooDoo Mandala, 1970, acrylic on canvas with metal grommets and cotton rope, 90 x 89 1/2 x 1/4 inches. Courtesy Eric Firestone Gallery, New York

10.
In the fair’s “Presents” section, devoted to younger galleries, Ulterior has paired Douglas Goldberg’s sculptures with Mamie Tinkler’s watercolors of shells, knickknacks, and other objects, often shown reflected in mirrors à la James Rosenquist.
PIER 94, BOOTH P10

Mamie Tinkler, Nude Bird, 2019, watercolor and gouache on paper mounted to board, 20 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Ulterior Gallery, New York.

11.
Among the works being presented by Vielmetter Los Angeles is a Rodney McMillian landscape painting on found bedding; more are on view at Petzel Gallery’s 67th Street gallery through May 2.
PIER 94, BOOTH 803

Rodney McMillian, Untitled (Peach afghan), 2019, latex, ink on blanket, approximately 51 x 64 inches. Courtesy the artist and Vielmetter Los Angeles. Photo credit: Dawn Blackman.

12.
Garth Greenan Gallery has devoted its booth to a presentation of installations and collages, made between 1971 and 1980, by Los Angeles–based conceptual artist Alexis Smith. They include Smith’s Our Town (1980), a meditation on the American Dream incorporating texts from the play by Thornton Wilder.
PIER 94, BOOTH 809

Alexis Smith, Our Town (installation view), 1980, mixed media collage. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.”