Diversity Art Forum director Pauline de Souza on “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power” at Tate [Published 2017/10/06]

“‘Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power,’ a survey of work made by African-American artists between 1963 and 1983, offers insight into these artists’ practices at a number of levels.”

***NOW CLOSED***

“Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power”
through Oct. 22
Tate

“Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power,” a survey of work made by African American artists between 1963 and 1983, offers insight into these artists’ practices at a number of levels. Firstly, there are the social and political aspects of the art. Secondly, there are the aesthetic qualities of the paintings, collages, books, photographs and films on view. And thirdly, there is the interchange between the artists themselves. The show is installed in a way that brings these threads together beautifully, making the exhibition a joy to navigate.

Emory Douglas, 21 August 1971, “We Shall Survive, Without a Doubt,” 1971, newspaper, 17 1/2 x 22 3/4 inches. Center for the Study of Political Graphics, Culver City, CA. Copyright © Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo courtesy of Emory Douglas/Art Resource, New York.